Smart Cities

  • Making the switch to a net-zero mindset

    Wednesday, Dec 15, 2021
    by Denise Valenti, Office of Communications

    Green technology holds the promise of significantly reducing carbon emissions and helping humanity to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. But without buy-in from individuals and groups — whether it’s building new habits and routines to conserve energy or galvanizing support to enact policies that will enable the transition to cleaner tech — progress is likely to occur far more slowly than what is needed.

  • Tech pioneers to headline Engage 2021 conference on innovation and entrepreneurship

    Tuesday, Nov 23, 2021
    by Molly Sharlach

    Engage 2021, Princeton’s second annual innovation and entrepreneurship conference, will be held online Dec. 1 and 2. The conference, which is free and open to everyone, offers opportunities to learn about, and catalyze, the transformation of discoveries into innovations that benefit society — from biomedicine and clean energy to wireless, cryptocurrency and quantum computing.

  • Andlinger Center partners with Worley to work towards net-zero emissions

    Thursday, Jun 10, 2021
    by Molly A. Seltzer

    Worley, a global provider of engineering, procurement and construction services, has joined Princeton E-ffiliates Partnership as a charter member of the corporate membership program of the Andlinger Center, with a desire to help move the world to carbon neutrality through its vision for sustainable projects and operations.

  • Research meets the challenge of measuring urban carbon emissions

    Monday, May 17, 2021
    by Morgan Kelly, High Meadows Environmental Institute

    As more people call for action against climate change, more than 500 cities worldwide have established low-carbon and net-zero carbon goals intended to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the coming decades.

    But a major challenge to these decarbonization plans is the lack of a consensus on how to measure urban carbon emissions in the first place.

  • Study shows how cities can consider race and income in household energy efficiency programs

    Monday, Jun 7, 2021
    by Rachel Nuwer

    Climate change and social inequality are two pressing issues that often overlap. A new study led by Princeton researchers offers a roadmap for cities to address inequalities in energy use by providing fine-grained methods for measuring both income and racial disparities in energy use intensity. Energy use intensity, the amount of energy used per unit floor area, is often used as a proxy for assessing the efficiency of buildings and the upgrades they receive over time.

  • Princeton Announces Engage 2020, New Innovation and Entrepreneurship Conference

    Wednesday, Oct 14, 2020

    The mission of Princeton University will be brought to life in a new way through Engage 2020, the inaugural innovation and entrepreneurship conference scheduled for November 4-6, 2020. Presented by the Princeton innovation and entrepreneurship team and its campus partners, Engage 2020 will offer more than 50 live, online sessions of relevance to academia, business and industry, Princeton alumni, entrepreneurs, investors, foundations and the intellectually curious.

  • Architecture dean Monica Ponce de Leon named ‘Great Immigrant’ for contributions to American society

    Wednesday, Jul 1, 2020
    by The Office of Communications

    Monica Ponce de Leon, dean of the School of Architecture at Princeton University, has been honored as a “Great Immigrant” by the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

    Ponce de Leon, who was born in Venezuela, is among 38 naturalized U.S. citizens from 35 countries of origin who will be celebrated for their contributions to American society. 

  • Solutions to urban heat differ between tropical and drier climes

    Wednesday, Sep 4, 2019
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    In summer heat, cities may swelter more than nearby suburbs and rural areas. And while the size of this urban heat island effect varies widely among the world’s cities, heat island intensity can largely be explained by a city’s population and precipitation level, researchers reported in a paper published Sept. 4 in the journal Nature.

Pages

Subscribe to Smart Cities