Research

Stories about Princeton research relevant to a corporate and foundation audience.

  • Princeton Catalysis Initiative fosters research innovation

    Wednesday, Jan 23, 2019
    by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

    Through the Princeton Catalysis Initiative (PCI), scientists, engineers and scholars are reaching across disciplinary boundaries to create and explore new research areas at the intersection of what were once separate fields. PCI held its second annual symposium on campus Jan. 15-16, bringing researchers together to help fan the sparks of innovation and collaboration.

  • Machine learning could reduce testing, improve treatment for intensive care patients

    Tuesday, Jan 15, 2019
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    Doctors in intensive care units face a continual dilemma: Every blood test they order could yield critical information, but also adds costs and risks for patients. To address this challenge, researchers from Princeton University are developing a computational approach to help clinicians more effectively monitor patients’ conditions and make decisions about the best opportunities to order lab tests for specific patients.

  • Going quantum to unlock plants' secrets

    Tuesday, Jan 15, 2019
    by Kevin McElwee for the Office of the Dean for Research

    When it comes to green living, nobody does it better than plants. When plants convert light into fuel through photosynthesis, not a single particle of light is wasted. If we could unlock plants’ secrets, we might be able to perfect the design of light harvesting in solar cells.

  • From math to meaning: Artificial intelligence blends algorithms and applications

    Wednesday, Jan 2, 2019
    by Kevin McElwee for the Office of the Dean for Research

    Artificial intelligence is already a part of everyday life. It helps us answer questions like “Is this email spam?” It identifies friends in online photographs, selects news stories based on our politics and helps us deposit checks via our phones — if all somewhat imperfectly.

  • Expanding an innovation ecosystem: Princeton leads the way in 2018

    Wednesday, Dec 26, 2018
    by Princeton University

    The year 2018 represented a pivotal point in the development of an innovation ecosystem in the heart of New Jersey as Princeton University established significant new collaborations with pioneering members of industry — all with the aim of bolstering the resources available to researchers and scientists in their quest to make new discoveries in the service of society.

  • Researchers find a way to peel slimy biofilms like old stickers

    Wednesday, Dec 5, 2018
    by Adam Hadhazy for the Office of Engineering Communications

    Slimy, hard-to-clean bacterial mats called biofilms cause problems ranging from medical infections to clogged drains and fouled industrial equipment. Now, researchers at Princeton have found a way to cleanly and completely peel off these notorious sludges.

  • New tools illuminate mechanisms behind overlooked cellular components’ critical roles

    Friday, Nov 30, 2018
    by Adam Hadhazy for the Office of Engineering Communications

    Creating new tools that harness light to probe the mysteries of cellular behavior, Princeton researchers have made discoveries about the formation of cellular components called membraneless organelles and the key role these organelles play in cells.

    In two papers published Nov. 29 in the journal Cell, researchers from multiple Princeton departments report on the conditions that lead to the formation of membraneless organelles and the impact that the formation has on cellular DNA.

  • Sedgewick receives prize for mathematical exposition

    Monday, Nov 26, 2018
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    The American Mathematical Society has awarded its 2019 Leroy P. Steele Prize for Mathematical Exposition to Robert Sedgewick, Princeton’s William O. Baker *39 Professor in Computer Science, and posthumously to French computer scientist Philippe Flajolet, for their 2009 book “Analytic Combinatorics.”

  • Merging memory and computation, programmable chip speeds AI, slashes power use

    Wednesday, Nov 14, 2018
    by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications

    By shifting a fundamental property of computation, Princeton researchers have built a new type of computer chip that boosts the performance and slashes the energy demands of systems used for artificial intelligence.

    The chip, which works with standard programming languages, could be particularly useful on phones, watches or other devices that rely on high-performance computing and have limited battery life.

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