Research WIth

  • Science in the service of humanity: Princeton joins Rutgers, NJIT to advance health-related innovations

    Thursday, Feb 27, 2020
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    Princeton faculty and student researchers make many discoveries that have the potential to address cancer, infectious disease, autism and other development disorders, and other medical, behavioral and health challenges.

    Now, a collaboration with Rutgers University and the New Jersey Institute of Technology is making it easier and faster for Princeton's medical and health-related research to reach patients and the community.

  • It’s all in the delivery — nanoparticle platform could transform medical treatments

    Wednesday, Feb 12, 2020
    by Amelia Herb, Office of Engineering Communications

    Optimeos Life Sciences, a startup founded by two Princeton University faculty members, has reached agreements with six pharmaceutical companies to develop therapeutics using a Princeton-developed drug delivery technology. The collaborations have the potential to improve the effectiveness of medications for the treatment of diseases, ranging from cancer to diabetes.  

  • Rodney Priestley assumes new role as innovation leader at Princeton

    Wednesday, Feb 5, 2020
    As the University's innovation leader, Priestley, a professor of chemical and biological engineering, will oversee efforts to grow Princeton's culture of innovation as a means to further its teaching and research mission and enhance its impact on the world.
  • Quantum computing: Opening new realms of possibilities

    Tuesday, Jan 21, 2020
    by Tom Garlinghouse for the Office of the Dean for Research

    Hidden beneath our everyday world — on the infinitesimal scale of atomic and subatomic particles — is a strange and elusive realm. It is a Lewis Carroll-like place where ghostly particles pop in and out of existence, swirling electrons occupy two positions at once, and objects possess dual natures — they can be both waves and particles simultaneously.

  • Baby and adult brains ‘sync up’ during play, finds Princeton Baby Lab

    Thursday, Jan 9, 2020
    by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

    Have you ever played with a baby and felt a sense of connection, even though they couldn’t yet talk to you? New research suggests that you might quite literally be “on the same wavelength,” experiencing similar brain activity in the same brain regions.

  • AI-based motion-capture system for animals has applications from drug development to ecology

    Wednesday, Jan 8, 2020
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    A new system that uses artificial intelligence to track animal movements is poised to aid a wide range of studies, from exploring new drugs that affect behavior to ecological research. The approach, shown in the video above, can be used with laboratory animals such as fruit flies and mice as well as larger animals.

  • ‘Grow-and-prune’ AI mimics brain development, slashes energy use

    Friday, Dec 20, 2019
    by Scott Lyon, Office of Engineering Communications

    It may come as a shock to parents facing the daily chaos of toddler life, but the brain's complexity peaks around age 3.

    The number of connections between neurons virtually explodes in our first few years. After that the brain starts pruning away unused portions of this vast electrical network, slimming to roughly half the number by the time we reach adulthood. The overprovisioning of the toddler brain allows us to acquire language and develop fine motor skills. But what we don't use, we lose.

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