Physical Sciences

  • In leap for quantum computing, silicon quantum bits establish a long-distance relationship

    Monday, Dec 30, 2019
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    Imagine a world where people could only talk to their next-door neighbor, and messages must be passed house to house to reach far destinations.

    Until now, this has been the situation for the bits of hardware that make up a silicon quantum computer, a type of quantum computer with the potential to be cheaper and more versatile than today's versions.

  • New rules illuminate how objects absorb and emit light

    Monday, Dec 23, 2019
    by Scott Lyon, Office of Engineering Communications

    Princeton researchers have uncovered new rules governing how objects absorb and emit light, fine-tuning scientists' control over light and boosting research into next-generation solar and optical devices.

    The discovery solves a longstanding problem of scale, where light's behavior when interacting with tiny objects violates well-established physical constraints observed at larger scales.

  • Foam offers way to manipulate light

    Tuesday, Nov 19, 2019
    by Steven Schultz, Office of Engineering Communications

    There is more to foam than meets the eye. Literally. A study by Princeton scientists has shown that a type of foam long studied by researchers is able to block particular wavelengths of light, a coveted property for next-generation information technology that uses light instead of electricity.

  • Schmidt DataX Fund supports research projects that harness data science to speed up discovery

    Monday, Nov 18, 2019
    by Sharon Adarlo, Center for Statistics and Machine Learning

    Nine data-driven research projects have won funding from Princeton University’s Schmidt DataX Fund, which aims to spread and deepen the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning across campus to accelerate discovery.

    In February, the University announced the new fund, which was made possible through a major gift from Schmidt Futures.

  • Princeton's James Peebles receives Nobel Prize in Physics

    Tuesday, Oct 8, 2019
    by The Office of Communications

    Princeton University professor emeritus and 1962 graduate alumnus James Peebles has been awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics "for theoretical discoveries in physical cosmology."

    "This year's prize goes to contributions to our understanding of the evolution of our universe and Earth's place in the cosmos," Göran K. Hansson, secretary general of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said today. 

  • Princeton announces initiative to propel innovations in quantum science and technology

    Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    Princeton University has announced the creation of the Princeton Quantum Initiative to foster research and training across the spectrum from fundamental quantum science to its application in areas such as computing, sensing and communications.

    The new initiative builds on Princeton's world-renowned expertise in quantum science, the area of physics that describes behaviors at the scale of atoms and electrons. Quantum technologies have the potential to revolutionize areas ranging from secure data transmission to biomedical research, to the discovery of new materials.

  • Solutions to urban heat differ between tropical and drier climes

    Wednesday, Sep 4, 2019
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    In summer heat, cities may swelter more than nearby suburbs and rural areas. And while the size of this urban heat island effect varies widely among the world’s cities, heat island intensity can largely be explained by a city’s population and precipitation level, researchers reported in a paper published Sept. 4 in the journal Nature.

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