Materials Science

  • Experiments explore the mysteries of 'magic' angle superconductors

    Wednesday, Jul 31, 2019
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    In spring 2018, the surprising discovery of superconductivity in a new material set the scientific community abuzz. Built by layering one carbon sheet atop another and twisting the top one at a "magic" angle, the material enabled electrons to flow without resistance, a trait that could dramatically boost energy efficient power transmission and usher in a host of new technologies.

  • Small but mighty: A mini plasma-powered satellite under construction may launch a new era in space exploration

    Friday, Jul 26, 2019
    by John Greenwald, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    A tiny satellite under construction at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) could open new horizons in space exploration. Princeton University students are building the device, a cubic satellite or "CubeSat," as a testbed for a miniaturized rocket thruster with unique capabilities being developed at PPPL.

  • Innovative tiny laser has potential uses in drug quality control, medical diagnosis, airplane safety

    Wednesday, Jul 24, 2019
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    In a major step toward developing portable scanners that can rapidly measure molecules on the pharmaceutical production line or classify tissue in patients’ skin, a Princeton-led team of researchers has created an imaging system that uses lasers small and efficient enough to fit on a microchip.

    The team demonstrated the system’s resolution by using it to image a U.S. quarter. Fine details like the eagle’s wing feathers, as small as one-fifth of a millimeter wide, were clearly visible.

  • Strange warping geometry helps to push scientific boundaries

    Monday, Jul 15, 2019
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    Atomic interactions in everyday solids and liquids are so complex that some of these materials’ properties continue to elude physicists’ understanding. Solving the problems mathematically is beyond the capabilities of modern computers, so scientists at Princeton University have turned to an unusual branch of geometry instead.

  • Princeton astrophysicists are closing in on the Hubble constant

    Tuesday, Jul 9, 2019
    by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

    Exactly how fast is the universe expanding?

    Scientists are still not completely sure, but a Princeton-led team of astrophysicists has used the neutron star merger detected in 2017 to come up with a new value for this figure, known as the Hubble constant. Their work appears in the current issue of the journal Nature Astronomy.

  • Four Princeton professors elected to National Academy of Sciences

    Wednesday, May 1, 2019
    by Princeton University

    The National Academy of Sciences has elected four Princeton faculty members to join its ranks. They are among 100 new members and 25 foreign associates who were selected in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. Those elected bring the total number of active members to 2,347 and the total number of foreign associates to 487. Foreign associates are nonvoting members of the academy, with citizenship outside the United States.

  • Symposium marks growth for Princeton’s materials institute

    Friday, Apr 5, 2019
    by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications

    Materials science is an "enabling discipline,” Dean of Engineering and Applied Science Emily A. Carter told the audience gathered for the annual symposium of Princeton’s materials institute last week. It allows researchers, students and entrepreneurs from widely different fields to come together to create new technologies and solutions to difficult societal problems.

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