Life Sciences

  • Princeton researchers map rural U.S. counties most vulnerable to COVID-19

    Thursday, Apr 16, 2020
    by Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute

    A county-by-county analysis of the United States by Princeton University researchers suggests that rural counties with high populations of people over 60 and limited access to health care facilities could eventually be among the hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) that has so far killed more than 100,000 people worldwide.

  • Princeton awards over half-a-million dollars in funding for rapid, novel and actionable COVID-19 research projects

    Friday, Apr 10, 2020
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    With the aim of accelerating solutions to the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic, Princeton has awarded University funding for seven new faculty-led research initiatives with strong potential for impact.

    The funding enables faculty and their teams to address crucial questions in biomedical, health-related and fundamental science, as well as policy, social and economic topics. Projects will receive funding of up to $100,000.

  • Particle physicists design simplified ventilator for COVID-19 patients

    Thursday, Apr 9, 2020
    by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

    An international team of particle physicists have paused their search for dark matter to focus on the needs of victims of the global pandemic — in particular, their need to breathe.

    In severe cases, COVID-19 can lead to pneumonia requiring mechanical ventilation, but the world’s supply of ventilators has proven too small for the exponentially increasing demand.

  • NSF RAPID grant awarded for study of how anxiety affects the spread of COVID-19 information

    Thursday, Apr 2, 2020
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    Princeton researchers have been awarded a National Science Foundation RAPID grant to study how anxiety about COVID-19 influences how we learn and share information about the pandemic.

    The NSF's Rapid Response Research (RAPID) program funds proposals that require quick-response research on disasters and unanticipated events.

    What the researchers find could help inform the design of campaigns to enhance communication of accurate information and decrease misinformation during times of crisis.

  • New mathematical model can more effectively track epidemics

    Wednesday, Mar 25, 2020
    by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications

    As COVID-19 spreads worldwide, leaders are relying on mathematical models to make public health and economic decisions.

    A new model developed by Princeton and Carnegie Mellon researchers improves tracking of epidemics by accounting for mutations in diseases. Now, the researchers are working to apply their model to allow leaders to evaluate the effects of countermeasures to epidemics before they deploy them.

  • Science in the service of humanity: Princeton joins Rutgers, NJIT to advance health-related innovations

    Thursday, Feb 27, 2020
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    Princeton faculty and student researchers make many discoveries that have the potential to address cancer, infectious disease, autism and other development disorders, and other medical, behavioral and health challenges.

    Now, a collaboration with Rutgers University and the New Jersey Institute of Technology is making it easier and faster for Princeton's medical and health-related research to reach patients and the community.

  • It’s all in the delivery — nanoparticle platform could transform medical treatments

    Wednesday, Feb 12, 2020
    by Amelia Herb, Office of Engineering Communications

    Optimeos Life Sciences, a startup founded by two Princeton University faculty members, has reached agreements with six pharmaceutical companies to develop therapeutics using a Princeton-developed drug delivery technology. The collaborations have the potential to improve the effectiveness of medications for the treatment of diseases, ranging from cancer to diabetes.  

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