Foundations

  • Timing is key for bacteria surviving antibiotics

    Monday, Jul 2, 2018
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    For bacteria facing a dose of antibiotics, timing might be the key to evading destruction. In a series of experiments, Princeton researchers found that cells that repaired DNA damaged by antibiotics before resuming growth had a much better chance of surviving treatment.

    When antibiotics hit a population of bacteria, often a small fraction of “persister” cells survive to pose a threat of recurrent infection. Unlike bacteria with genetic resistance to antibiotics, evidence suggests that persisters stay alive in part by stalling cellular processes targeted by the drugs.

  • Researchers apply computing power to track the spread of cancer

    Tuesday, Jul 3, 2018
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    Princeton researchers have developed a new computational method that increases the ability to track the spread of cancer cells from one part of the body to another.

    This migration of cells can lead to metastatic disease, which causes about 90 percent of cancer deaths from solid tumors — masses of cells that grow in organs such as the breast, prostate or colon. Understanding the drivers of metastasis could lead to new treatments aimed at blocking the process of cancer spreading through the body.

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