Environmental/Energy/Sustainability

  • '100-year' floods will happen every one to 30 years, according to new coastal flood prediction maps

    Tuesday, Aug 27, 2019
    by Jen A. Miller for the Office of Engineering Communications

    A 100-year flood is supposed to be just that: a flood that occurs once every 100 years, or a flood that has a 1% chance of happening every year.

    But Princeton researchers have developed new maps that predict coastal flooding for every county on the Eastern and Gulf Coasts and find 100-year floods could become annual occurrences in New England; and happen every one to 30 years along the southeast Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico shorelines.

  • When will we observe significant changes in the ocean due to climate change? New study offers road map

    Monday, Aug 19, 2019
    by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research

    Sea temperature and ocean acidification have climbed during the last three decades to levels beyond what is expected due to natural variation alone, a new study led by Princeton researchers finds. Meanwhile other impacts from climate change, such as changes in the activity of ocean microbes that regulate the Earth’s carbon and oxygen cycles, will take several more decades to a century to appear. The report was published Aug. 19 online in the journal Nature Climate Change.

  • Offshore oil and gas rigs leak more greenhouse gas than expected

    Thursday, Aug 15, 2019
    by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications

    A survey of offshore installations extracting oil and natural gas in the North Sea revealed far more leakage of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, than currently estimated by the British government, according to a research team led by scientists from Princeton University.

  • Princeton students Marquardt and Shah win Slavin Fellowships for work in entrepreneurship

    Friday, Aug 9, 2019
    by Wright Señeres, Princeton Entrepreneurship Council

    As another sign that entrepreneurship is booming at Princeton University, the Slavin Family Foundation awarded undergraduates Matthew Marquardt, a chemistry major in the Class of 2021, and Rohan Shah, a molecular biology major in the Class of 2020, with Slavin Fellowships for their work in entrepreneurship on campus and beyond. They are among 26 global recipients of the Slavin Fellowships. 

  • A small number of leaky natural gas wells produce large emissions of greenhouse gases

    Thursday, Aug 1, 2019
    by Molly Seltzer, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

    Wells that extract natural gas from underground often leak large amounts of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, into the air. A team of Princeton University researchers has found that, in one of the biggest gas-producing regions, most of these emissions come from a tiny subset of the wells, a finding with major implications for how to control the problem. 

  • Ramaswami, researcher of urban sustainability, appointed inaugural director of Chadha Center for Global India

    Tuesday, Jul 30, 2019

    Anu Ramaswami, an interdisciplinary environmental engineer who is recognized as a pioneer and leader on the topic of sustainable urban systems, has been named professor of India studies, civil and environmental engineering, and the Princeton Environmental Institute, and the inaugural director of the M.S. Chadha Center for Global India. She will assume her new duties at Princeton on Aug. 1.

    By Pooja Makhijani, Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies

  • Innovative tiny laser has potential uses in drug quality control, medical diagnosis, airplane safety

    Wednesday, Jul 24, 2019
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    In a major step toward developing portable scanners that can rapidly measure molecules on the pharmaceutical production line or classify tissue in patients’ skin, a Princeton-led team of researchers has created an imaging system that uses lasers small and efficient enough to fit on a microchip.

    The team demonstrated the system’s resolution by using it to image a U.S. quarter. Fine details like the eagle’s wing feathers, as small as one-fifth of a millimeter wide, were clearly visible.

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