Environmental/Energy/Sustainability

  • Twelve Princeton faculty elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

    Friday, Apr 24, 2020
    by The Office of Communications

    Princeton faculty members Rubén Gallo, M. Zahid Hasan, Amaney Jamal, Ruby Lee, Margaret Martonosi, Tom Muir, Eve Ostriker, Alexander Smits, Leeat Yariv, James Stone and Muhammad Qasim Zaman have been named members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Visiting faculty member Alondra Nelson also was elected to the academy. 

    They are among 276 scholars, scientists, artists and leaders in the public, nonprofit and private sectors elected this year in recognition of their contributions to their respective fields.

  • Human-caused warming will cause more slow-moving hurricanes, warn climatologists

    Wednesday, Apr 22, 2020
    by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

    Hurricanes moving slowly over an area can cause more damage than faster-moving storms, because the longer a storm lingers, the more time it has to pound an area with storm winds and drop huge volumes of rain, leading to flooding. The extraordinary damage caused by storms like Dorian (2019), Florence (2018) and Harvey (2017) prompted Princeton’s Gan Zhang to wonder whether global climate change will make these slow-moving storms more common.

  • Princeton scientist solves air quality puzzle: Why is ozone pollution persisting in Europe despite environmental laws banning it?

    Monday, Apr 20, 2020
    by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

    When high in the atmosphere, ozone protects Earth from harmful solar radiation — but ozone at ground level is a significant pollutant. Exposure to high concentrations of ground-level ozone aggravates respiratory illnesses, thus exacerbating the negative health effects of heat and contributing to the catastrophic impacts of recent heatwaves and drought in Europe.

  • Princeton researchers map rural U.S. counties most vulnerable to COVID-19

    Thursday, Apr 16, 2020
    by Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute

    A county-by-county analysis of the United States by Princeton University researchers suggests that rural counties with high populations of people over 60 and limited access to health care facilities could eventually be among the hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) that has so far killed more than 100,000 people worldwide.

  • Real-life examples bring new energy to core thermodynamics course

    Thursday, Jan 9, 2020
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    Traditionally, engineering students have learned about the thermodynamics of gas turbines by studying diagrams and solving equations, but this year they also donned hard hats, safety glasses and ear plugs to tour a plant that produces electricity for half a million homes.

  • Schmidt DataX Fund supports research projects that harness data science to speed up discovery

    Monday, Nov 18, 2019
    by Sharon Adarlo, Center for Statistics and Machine Learning

    Nine data-driven research projects have won funding from Princeton University’s Schmidt DataX Fund, which aims to spread and deepen the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning across campus to accelerate discovery.

    In February, the University announced the new fund, which was made possible through a major gift from Schmidt Futures.

  • Solutions to urban heat differ between tropical and drier climes

    Wednesday, Sep 4, 2019
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    In summer heat, cities may swelter more than nearby suburbs and rural areas. And while the size of this urban heat island effect varies widely among the world’s cities, heat island intensity can largely be explained by a city’s population and precipitation level, researchers reported in a paper published Sept. 4 in the journal Nature.

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