Environmental/Energy/Sustainability

  • Andlinger Center conference tackles challenges of a changing climate

    Monday, Oct 1, 2018
    by Molly Seltzer, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

    Hurricane Sandy sent a clear message on climate change, Tammy Snyder Murphy, the first lady of New Jersey, told the audience in her keynote speech at a Princeton climate conference Friday, Sept. 21.

    “We’re not looking at Sandy as just some part of our history, but something that we know will happen again unless we take action,” said Murphy, who plays a key role in the governor’s administration on climate and environmental policy. “We are accepting the challenge that climate change has presented. We are committed to making this state the magnet for innovative solutions.”

  • First results are in: New sky survey suggests dark matter is less ‘lumpy’ than previously believed

    Friday, Sep 28, 2018
    by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

    Using the first year of data gathered by the Hyper Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope, an international team of researchers has created and analyzed the deepest-ever map of dark matter.

    The Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey collaboration team, including scientists from Princeton University, Japan and Taiwan, used tiny gravitational distortions in images of about 10 million galaxies to make a precise measurement of the “lumpiness,” or uneven distribution, of matter in the universe.

  • Princeton Research Day puts spotlight on innovative work across University

    Monday, May 14, 2018
    by Princeton University

    Spend the day — or an hour — at Princeton Research Day, and you get an eclectic tour of research at Princeton University shared through presentations designed to make cutting-edge work accessible to the general public.

    For Sarah-Jane Leslie, dean of the Graduate School and the Class of 1943 Professor of Philosophy, that tour included learning how engineers can learn lessons from plants; about new techniques to fight disease; and about novel ways to address the world’s energy crisis.

  • Modern alchemists are making chemistry greener

    Thursday, Jun 14, 2018
    by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

    Ancient alchemists tried to turn lead and other common metals into gold and platinum. Modern chemists in Paul Chirik’s lab at Princeton are transforming reactions that have depended on environmentally unfriendly precious metals, finding cheaper and greener alternatives to replace platinum, rhodium and other precious metals in drug production and other reactions.

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