Engineering

  • Particle physicists design simplified ventilator for COVID-19 patients

    Thursday, Apr 9, 2020
    by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

    An international team of particle physicists have paused their search for dark matter to focus on the needs of victims of the global pandemic — in particular, their need to breathe.

    In severe cases, COVID-19 can lead to pneumonia requiring mechanical ventilation, but the world’s supply of ventilators has proven too small for the exponentially increasing demand.

  • New mathematical model can more effectively track epidemics

    Wednesday, Mar 25, 2020
    by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications

    As COVID-19 spreads worldwide, leaders are relying on mathematical models to make public health and economic decisions.

    A new model developed by Princeton and Carnegie Mellon researchers improves tracking of epidemics by accounting for mutations in diseases. Now, the researchers are working to apply their model to allow leaders to evaluate the effects of countermeasures to epidemics before they deploy them.

  • Rodney Priestley assumes new role as innovation leader at Princeton

    Wednesday, Feb 5, 2020
    As the University's innovation leader, Priestley, a professor of chemical and biological engineering, will oversee efforts to grow Princeton's culture of innovation as a means to further its teaching and research mission and enhance its impact on the world.
  • Real-life examples bring new energy to core thermodynamics course

    Thursday, Jan 9, 2020
    by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications

    Traditionally, engineering students have learned about the thermodynamics of gas turbines by studying diagrams and solving equations, but this year they also donned hard hats, safety glasses and ear plugs to tour a plant that produces electricity for half a million homes.

  • New rules illuminate how objects absorb and emit light

    Monday, Dec 23, 2019
    by Scott Lyon, Office of Engineering Communications

    Princeton researchers have uncovered new rules governing how objects absorb and emit light, fine-tuning scientists' control over light and boosting research into next-generation solar and optical devices.

    The discovery solves a longstanding problem of scale, where light's behavior when interacting with tiny objects violates well-established physical constraints observed at larger scales.

  • ‘Grow-and-prune’ AI mimics brain development, slashes energy use

    Friday, Dec 20, 2019
    by Scott Lyon, Office of Engineering Communications

    It may come as a shock to parents facing the daily chaos of toddler life, but the brain's complexity peaks around age 3.

    The number of connections between neurons virtually explodes in our first few years. After that the brain starts pruning away unused portions of this vast electrical network, slimming to roughly half the number by the time we reach adulthood. The overprovisioning of the toddler brain allows us to acquire language and develop fine motor skills. But what we don't use, we lose.

  • Foam offers way to manipulate light

    Tuesday, Nov 19, 2019
    by Steven Schultz, Office of Engineering Communications

    There is more to foam than meets the eye. Literally. A study by Princeton scientists has shown that a type of foam long studied by researchers is able to block particular wavelengths of light, a coveted property for next-generation information technology that uses light instead of electricity.

  • Schmidt DataX Fund supports research projects that harness data science to speed up discovery

    Monday, Nov 18, 2019
    by Sharon Adarlo, Center for Statistics and Machine Learning

    Nine data-driven research projects have won funding from Princeton University’s Schmidt DataX Fund, which aims to spread and deepen the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning across campus to accelerate discovery.

    In February, the University announced the new fund, which was made possible through a major gift from Schmidt Futures.

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