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Princeton's F. Duncan Haldane Receives Nobel Prize in Physics

Princeton E-ffiliates Partnership and Exxonmobil Announce Five Collaborative Research Projects on Energy and the Environment

Scientists Get Their First Look Into How Bacteria Construct A Slimy Biofilm Fortress

FACULTY AWARD: Bassler to Receive Pearl Meister Greengard Prize for Women Scientists 

FACULTY AWARD: Five Princeton professors among inaugural HHMI-Simons Faculty Scholars

FACULTY HONOR: Mónica Ponce de León elected member of the National Academy (formerly the Academy of Design)

Craig Arnold: Perspective on the Allure and Reach of Materials Science

PPPL and Princeton Demonstrate a Novel Physical Technique Applicable to Future Nuclear Disarmament Agreements 

PEI Awards $433,500 for Innovative Research, Teaching, and Mentorship in Climate and Energy

Pagels Awarded National Humanities Medal

Sam Wang Looks for Order in Chaos — In Neuroscience, Political Polling and Redistricting

New Method Identifies Protein-Protein Interactions on Basis of Sequence Alone

Claire White Receives National Science Foundation Grant to Study Green Cement

Data Drive Quests to Control Nuclear Fusion

Princeton Professor Overcomes Challenges Facing Women in Science to Earn N.J. Chamber Honor

Program Exposes Students to 'Fascinating Complexity' of Startup Businesses

Failures Aside, Haushofer Reaches Across Disciplines to Tackle Poverty

Summer Undergraduates Learn the Ropes of Research

Demo Day Emphasizes Intersection of Education and Entrepreneurship 

Princeton Alumnus Hart Awarded Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences

Cold War-era Satellite Dish, Restored by Princeton Scientists, Becomes Teaching Tool

Dr. Alexei Korennykh, Associate Professor in the Department of Molecular Biology, Wins Vallee Young Investigator Award

FACULTY AWARD: Bassler receives Max Planck Research Award

Undergrads Get Research Experience in Lading Labs

New Microchip Demonstrates Efficiency and Scalable Design 

Stiff and Oxygen-Deprived Tumors Promote Spread of Cancer

The Chronicle of Higher Education Publishes Article "Princeton Strives to Help First-Generation Students Feel More at Home"




Princeton Journal Watch:
New research findings from Princeton University

By Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research Genomic sequencing has provided an enormous amount of new information, but researchers haven’t always been able to use that data to understand living systems. Now a group of researchers has used mathematical analysis to figure out whether two proteins interact with each other, just by looking…

By Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications Princeton University researchers have compiled 30 years of data to construct the first ice core-based record of atmospheric oxygen concentrations spanning the past 800,000 years, according to a paper published today in the journal Science. The record shows that atmospheric oxygen has declined 0.7 percent relative to current atmospheric-oxygen…

By John Greenwald, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Among the top puzzles in the development of fusion energy is the best shape for the magnetic facility — or “bottle” — that will provide the next steps in the development of fusion reactors. Leading candidates include spherical tokamaks, compact machines that are shaped like cored apples, compared…

By John Greenwald, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Communications Among the intriguing issues in plasma physics are those surrounding X-ray pulsars — collapsed stars that orbit around a cosmic companion and beam light at regular intervals, like lighthouses in the sky.  Physicists want to know the strength of the magnetic field and density of the plasma…

By Staff An international team of researchers has predicted the existence of several previously unknown types of quantum particles in materials. The particles — which belong to the class of particles known as fermions — can be distinguished by several intrinsic properties, such as their responses to applied magnetic and electric fields. In several cases,…

By Katherine Unger Baillie, courtesy of the University of Pennsylvania It has remained frustratingly difficult to develop a vaccine for HIV/AIDS, in part because the virus, once in our bodies, rapidly reproduces and evolves to escape being killed by the immune system. “The viruses are constantly producing mutants that evade detection,” said Joshua Plotkin, a…

  By Marisa Sanders for the Office of the Dean for Research A new study by researchers at Princeton University suggests that sporadic bursts of gene activity may be important features of genetic regulation rather than just occasional mishaps. The researchers found that snippets of DNA called enhancers can boost the frequency of bursts, suggesting…

By Kristin Qian for the Office of the Dean for Research Researchers at Princeton University have developed a highly sensitive and precise method to explore genes important for memory formation within single neurons of the Drosophila fly brain. With this method, the researchers found an unexpected result: certain genes involved in creating long-term memories in…

By Tien Nguyen, Department of Chemistry Using a powerful combination of techniques from biophysics to mathematics, researchers have revealed new insights into the mechanism of a liver enzyme that is critical for human health. The enzyme, phenylalanine hydroxylase, turns the essential amino acid phenylalanine – found in eggs, beef and many other foods and as…

By: Tien Nguyen, Department of Chemistry Theoretical chemists at Princeton University have pioneered a strategy for modeling quantum friction, or how a particle’s environment drags on it, a vexing problem in quantum mechanics since the birth of the field. The study was published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. “It was truly a most…